Event Management Class Organizes Benefit Concert for Right Turn

Tags

, ,

Students from Bay State College’s Event Management class will be hosting their annual benefit concert on December 4th at 8:00pm at the Brighton Music Hall.

For the past three years, Bay State College Professor Jess White has assigned her Event Management students a semester-long service learning project designed to teach the fundamentals of producing a professional level event, while practicing the importance of social responsibility within the music industry. Twenty-seven students are involved in all aspects of producing this event and all profits will be donated to Right Turn; a local non-profit addiction facility based in Arlington, MA. 

 Right Turn provides addiction counseling, family therapy, life skill building, and also allows patients to express their feelings through music and showcase their talent at their own local café and on their radio station WTKK.

This event will be headlined by local Boston artist Shea Rose; a 2011 Berklee College graduate. Shea Rose has been recognized for her talents by legendary musician and actress Queen Latifah who chose her for a CoverGirl music campaign in 2010 and called Rose “America’s next female rapper.” Shea Rose delivers unique styles of music such as soul, funk rock, rap and jazz. Shea was named Artist of the year at 2011 Boston Music Awards after releasing her debut mix tape Rock’n’Rose (2010) and Little Warrior (2011). She has also been nominated for the 2012 Boston Music Award for best Pop/R&B Artist of the year and Female Vocalist of the Year. 

“We enjoy doing this event every year”, says Professor White.  “It is invaluable experience for our students in the Event Management class, and it give us the chance to give back to the community in a significant way.”

The show will be 18+ and admission is $15.  To purchase tickets online please visit http://brightonmusichall.com.Image

Advertisements

Service Learning – A Student’s Perspective

Tags

,

Jose Perez, 21, is working toward his bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice, planning to go into law enforcement and continue the work he’s doing with troubled youth at a Boston community center. Or he might follow in the footsteps of his mom, a judge, who encouraged him and his siblings to graduate from college, no matter what. Jose values higher education because it teaches people to challenge different perspectives and speak up.

Regardless of what Jose ends up doing in the future one thing is certain—he made the absolute most of his time here at Bay State. Jose has been involved in two of the big Service Learning initiatives the College has taken on in the past year. In May of 2012, Jose traveled to Costa Rice with our Service Learning team to volunteer in an orphanage with Dr. William Morrissette.

“As a student, I learned a lot from that experience and am thankful for the opportunity to grow my knowledge in such a unique way,” says Jose. Jose and Professor Morrissette continued their work when they returned back in the U.S. putting together and action plan and recommendations for the orphanage in regards to their day to day processes.

In the midst of all the work being put into the Costa Rica project, Jose was also highly involved in the new Inside Out Prisoner Exchange program from the very beginning. Inside Out is a nonprofit headquartered at Temple University that trains college professors to teach social sciences and humanities courses inside prisons to a mixed group of incarcerated and non-incarcerated students. Jose first heard about the program after attending a conference with Professor Morrissette and some of his peers. Just a few weeks ago, Jose finally got to sit in his first class at Plymouth MCI.

“It was great to be able to see this idea become a reality from beginning to end,” says Jose. “We end up sitting in that Friday night class much longer than we have to because we’re learning a lot from each other and everyone is actually enjoying the experience. It is great to see that Bay State is going after such interesting learning opportunities.”

Bay State College’s Criminal Justice Program Takes Classroom Inside Local Prison

 

InsideOutPhoto

Bay State College was recently granted access to hold their first Criminal Justice class inside a prison.  Representatives from the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Plymouth and Dr. William Morrissette, Department Chair of the Criminal Justice Program at Bay State College, have been in discussions for the past year to make it possible for the College to participate in the Inside Out Prisoner Exchange Program.

Inside Out is a nonprofit headquartered at Temple University that trains college professors to teach social sciences and humanities courses inside prisons to a mixed group of incarcerated and non-incarcerated students.  Ten Bay State College students from the day, evening, and Middleboro divisions will be enrolled in the Friday night Sustainable Justice course.

“It is our desire for our students to be a part of this important effort to bring diverse groups together, in community, with the goal of finding common ground and reflecting upon our place and our purpose in this world,” says Dr. William Morrissette.

The United States currently ranks first relative to the number of individuals incarcerated per capita.  This status has led many to ask whether our current criminal justice processes and the associated levels of incarceration are sustainable over the long term.  This course will explore the fundamental concepts of, and recent movement towards, building a sustainable approach to social and criminal justice.  Particular emphasis will be placed on the question of which criminal justice approaches hold the most promise to deliver both national and global sustainable justice.

Welcome Home!

Image

What an incredible opportunity to provide service and learn.  There is so much more I still want to know and will continue to investigate now that I’m back.  Looking forward to working with Georgia, Elizabeth and Natalia on all of the projects we want to do and send back to our program site and Maximo Nivel.  I miss being in Costa Rica with our hospice family.  My life has been touched in ways that I couldn’t have even imagined.  I really want to thank President Pfannenstiehl and the entire Bay State College Community for their support for this program. -Dr. Donnalee Shain, PTA Program Chair

Final Days in Costa Rica

Dr. Donnalee Shain, PTA Program Chair
Today was the last day at our site.  It was very sad to say adios.  The clients were waiting and lined up for us this morning- we had an awesome last day working with 12 of the 14 residents.  After we left, we had the opportunity to visit another completely different HIV/AIDS hospice.  The entire experience was entirely a humbling and rewarding one.  I will miss the people we met and hope that we can come back again.

Natalia Santana, Health Studies Student
Today was a hard day as it was our last and saying goodbye was so difficult. After saying our tough goodbyes we went and saw a different HIV/AIDS clinic that was run completely differently and it gave us a good perspective into the health care system in Costa Rica. The whole experience taught me to appreciate what I have and always have a positive outlook on life.

Elizabeth Roche, PTA Student
Our last day working at the hospice center. We have met some incredible individuals, and I have learned a lot about myself through this experience. I will definitely be able to apply a lot of what I did here in practice as a PTA student. We were able to visit another HIV/AIDS home today as well. Quite a difference from the one that we worked at. It was nice to be able to compare each to one another. Costa Rica will always hold a place in my heart and I will cherish this experience.

Dr. William Morrissette, Criminal Justice Program Chair
We completed our final day at the orphanage today and it was difficult to say good bye to the children.  I can’t help but feel guilty that we did not do more but the reality is that the children are healthy, happy and their future prospects are strong.  We were able to gain the final information we needed from the site and will look forward to helping Maximo Nivel organize future volunteer efforts.

Jose Perez, Criminal Justice Student
We have formed strong bonds with the children and feel we have made a lot of progress from day one. We are proud of the work we have accomplish and feel good with our research project. We have come to the conclusion that the program is running smoothly and is receiving enough funding. As far as recommendations, we feel that is necessary to create some sort of orientation before being sent to this particular site, and background experience is a big plus. As a student, I have learned a lot from this experience and am thankful for the opportunity to grow my knowledge in such a unique way.

Thank you to our Service Learning team for sharing some of their experiences all the way from Costa Rica! We look forward to a full report once they have had some time to reflect on their trip. 

Hands on Learning in Costa Rica: Part 3

Our Service Learning team continues to check in from Costa Rica.  As the week progresses, the group seems to be accomplishing a lot and we look forward to the knowledge they will be able to share with us upon their return. 

Georgia Thoidis, Health Studies
Local clinic:
Yet another rewarding day, patients were expecting us at the door to start their PT exercises. Our students ran the group exercise session and did an amazing job. We are very proud of them!

Dr. Donnalee Shain, PTA Program Chair
Local clinic:
We worked hard today and had fun.  Clients were waiting for us and eager to join in.  Saw new folks today and the students ran the exercise group.  Way to go girls! Looking forward to another day tomorrow with some new and creative activities. Everyone is doing great.  Bay State is being well represented.

Elizabeth Roche, PTA Student
Local clinic:
Today was a great day. It was awesome to see a lot of the residents come back for individualized PT, as well as some newcomers. Their enthusiasm is contagious, and really makes working with them easy! I learned a lot from watching Donnalee work with a patient that had a stroke, something that I have not yet had experienced working with. After our individualized PT sessions, Natalia and I led the group exercise class. It went really well, and the residents began to open up to us even more. I learned that thinking on your toes is very important, and sometimes you have to go with the flow! I am looking forward to seeing them all again tomorrow.

Natalia Santana, Health Studies Student
Local clinic:
It was yet again a great day. The residents of the hospice care center were very involved and excited. We saw some new people and were able to work with them one on one as well as in a group. We have come up with some great ideas for the rest of the week and I can’t wait to see the residents’ reaction.

Dr. William Morrissette, Criminal Justice Program Chair
Local orphanage:
We had a productive day today.  We were able to meet with the psychologist and learn a great deal about the orphanage and the child welfare system in general. We found strong evidence that restorative justice is being practiced here and in a unique way.  We were also able to do some literature review this morning which helped us to understand the history/development of children’s rights in Central America.  Looking forward to tomorrow.

Jose Perez, Criminal Justice Student
Local orphanage:
Day three was by far one of the most efficient days we have had so far. We had the chance to actually bring up some of our concerns and questions to the psychologist which was very helpful. She pointed out that the orphanage is more a transition place for kids that have been removes from their homes, rather than a long time commitment orphanage. Great Day overall.


Costa Rica Trip: Part 2

Tags

Dr. William Morrissette, Criminal Justice Program Chair
We just finished our second day at the orphanage.  We made a lot of progress today but we are battling against what the orphanage has as immediate needs and our larger research goals.  It was clear to us yesterday that there was no organization of the volunteers and this was making for a difficult time.  Today, we were able to organize the volunteers and achieve some of the goals that were provided by the psychiatrist that is assigned to work with the children.  The volunteers seemed relieved to have some leadership and direction.  Our success today provides us with a strong base to satisfy one of our objectives which is to help Maximo Nivel create a larger plan to organize and guide volunteers to assist the orphanage.  We were also able to speak with the staff and gained a fair amount of information regarding the criminal justice side of the orphanage and what the prospects are for the children.  More specifically, we had several moments which were reality checks for us.  We asked the orphanage, yesterday, what their needs were and they indicated fresh fruit.  We stopped at the market this morning and picked up fruit which the children were provided with at snack time.  It was rewarding to have an immediate impact on their quality of life.  A more difficult moment today was with the 8 month old at the orphanage who is sick.  I am not sure what is wrong with her but she cried for the better part of the three hours that we were there.  I held her for a long time but had little success in calming her.  We were also asked by the staff to work with a small child who is having speech problems.  Jose and I did a half hour of speech therapy with the boy.  We are certainly not experts in this field but we were the best that they had at this point and we gave it our best shot.

Dr. Donnalee Shain, Physical Therapist Assistant Program Chair
We saw several clients in the HIV/AIDS hospice.  We did 4 individual sessions and a group session.  Two patients were bed-ridden, but responsive.  Our students got to see first hand what it means when I say “it depends” when developing appropriate therapeutic interventions.  During our group session we had a variety of patients.  Three women (one of whom was pregnant), and the rest men with varying degrees of skill.  We included stretching, strengthening, conditioning and relaxation activities into the group session.  The clients loved it and we were joking around and learning a lot about them.  We were teaching each other our respective languages.  I’m gradually picking up more and more words.  The clients wanted to know if we will be back tomorrow – we sure will be.  The only time they have any type of structured activity is when volunteers are here.  We are hoping to create individual exercise binders and ones that can be used when other volunteers arrive.  We seemed to have managed the bus system and money exchange too.

BSC Students in Cost Rica: First Impressions

Jose Perez, Criminal Justice student
Dr. Morrissette and I visited the orphanage today for our first orientation. As we spent time with the children this morning, I couldn’t help but notice the smiles on their faces and how they welcomed us with open arms. I was also surprised by the way the children acclimated to us so quickly.  Perhaps they are used to people walking in and out of their lives. Moments to remember from today: a little girl name Andrea trying to teach Dr. Morrissette how to say “LIBRO” (Book) in Spanish.

Elizabeth Roche, Physical Therapist Assistant student
We’ve been on the go all day today, and I am constantly absorbing new information. It is great to have a base in the city with Maximo Nivel and living with a native family. We are really understanding what life is like here. Our first visit to our hospice care site left us with many questions, and we are determined to make as much impact as possible. We are also hoping to leave some education with the center on how to continue some PT care with their patients. I wish we could work with the patients on a longer term of care, but we will make the most of it! I am very impressed with the organization that we are working with. All of their employees have been very eager to help us in any way they can, and make things as smooth as possible. It’s great to be here!

Natalia Santana, Health Studies student
We have only been in Costa Rica for 24 hours and it has been non-stop. This being my first time out of the country, it has been a culture shock getting used to the transit systems as well as the food. It has been a wonderful experience so far seeing how a totally different country goes about their daily lives. We took our first visit to the hospice care center today, and we left with a game plan for the next 4 days. We really want to get to know them as people- highest level of education, religion, family, etc.  They have a decent amount of equipment and a number of patients. We are excited to get started and really try to leave an impact on their lives.

Bay State College Service Learning in Costa Rica

Tags

, , ,

Image

As you may already know, Bay State College sent 3 students and 3 faculty members on the College’s first ever International Interdisciplinary Service Learning Project in Costa Rica this week. Our faculty and students traveled together to Costa Rica and are working in conjunction with Maximo Nivel, an international volunteer and internship program, to provide assistance in either a local orphanage or hospice while gaining knowledge in their field of study.

We will be sharing some of their experiences on the blog this week starting with our 3 faculty members checking in with their first impressions:

We all arrived here safe and sound.  Its been quite a whirlwind finding our way around, riding the buses in town, finding our way to our projects when the buses change routes, and figuring out how to use the host family’s facilities.  We all took cold showers this morning!  Lots of walking and humidity.  We walked with the guys to the orphanage and the kids there just lit up when we walked in.  They loved trying to get into our bags, wearing our sunglasses and trying to take our coke bottles.  We had to leave the guys and take a 45 minute bus ride then 40 minute walk to Nuestra  Senora de Esperanza (Our Lady of Hope) hospice. We met the administrator, found the PT room and equipment- home made weights, antiquated but usable cardiac equipment and believe it or not a piece of equipment we never saw before called the horse rider – great piece of equipment.  Tonight we are researching specific activities for our patients/clients and hope to set up a program that they can use with other volunteers.  A lot to try and accomplish, when time works very differently here.  Will update you on that.
Pura vida (the one phrase I’ve learned)
Dr. Donnalee Shain, Physical Therapist Assistant Program Chair

An amazing experience so far, getting to know a different culture with our students is very rewarding, and hoping to make a difference in the patients lives even a small part with very limited resources will be a life changing experience for the students, long day, long bus rides. Hope all is well in Boston!
Georgia Thoidis, Health Studies

We arrived in country yesterday and first impressions were that we are clearly in a developing area with very little infrastructure.  Safety is a big issue here and we spent much of our first morning on safety briefings.  These briefings helped a great deal and we are now able to safely work in country.  We spent a few hours in the orphanage today and were introduced to the nine children ages 8 months to 4 years that are there.  The children were very friendly and invited us into their world very quickly.  The children are precious and our first impressions were that they are cared for well considering the surrounding environment.  We began to collect data from other volunteers and staff but too little information at this point to make any clear determinations on what the impacts are on these children relative to their abuse/neglect or other circumstances that have resulted in them being placed in the orphanage.  The issue that we have to tackle is a base of comparison.  The orphanage would likely be considered sub par compared to United States standards but may actually be above par compared to existing living conditions for most children in San Jose.  This is clearly relevant to predicting their likelihood of future success.  We are looking forward to more time with the children and staff tomorrow.
Dr. William Morrissette, Criminal Justice

It sounds like the group has hit the ground running! We’ll be posting more, particularly from the students’ perspectives, very soon.